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11.9 kgs. at 16 years of age for rural and urban area respectively. For girls there was a difference of 7.3 kg. and 6.2 kg. in weight for rural and urban children respectively at 10 years of age and 7.3 kg. and 9.8 kg. at 16 years of age. The difference in height was 11.9 kgs. at 16 years of age for rural and urban area respectively. For girls there was a difference of 7.3 kg. and 6.2 kg. in weight for rural and urban children respectively at 10 years of age and 7.3 kg. and 9.8 kg. at 16 years of age. The difference in height was 8.6 cms and 4.9 cms and 6.6cms. and 2.1 cms. for rural and urban areas respectively at 10 and 3 - 6 years of age 6. Even though for both rural and urban areas, the height and weight were lower in comparison with the affluent children, the differences were of a larger magnitude in the rural areas than in the urban areas studied, It is generally accepted that genetic or ethnic variation across populations in growth patterns among well nourished young children is small, at least as compared to differences between well nourished and malnourished children of the same ethnicity living in the same country7.

These differences are more pronounced when compared with NCHS data. Since the NCHS data is at one monthly interval the comparisons at 10 to 10.5 and 15 to 15.5 years of the present study have been made for values at 10.3 years and 15.3 years of NCHS. Both height and weight from rural and urban areas of the present study were below the 10th centile NCHS for both boys and girls8. Even the data on effluent children had shown that the height of boys and girls were between 20th and 30th centile of NCHS during the age period 10 to 16 years 6. Studies have also shown that the major difference between Indian affluent children and NCHS occurred after 10 years of age. Some possible explanations that have been suggested are that the improvement that occurs with improved socio-economic status has not yet reached a plateau, poor bio-availability of calcium from Predominantly cereal based Indian diets and a true genetic difference9.

The total gain in height from 10 to 16 years in the present study was 26.9 cms in rural areas and 31.7 cms. in urban areas for boys and 24.0 cms. and 24.8 cms. respectively for girls. The total gain in weight was 16.2 Kg. for rural area and 19.5 kg. for urban areas for boys. The corresponding figures for girls were 17.1 kg. for rural area and 18.5 kg. for urban areas studied. The gain in height during 10 to 16 .years was 25.0 cms. (rural), 28.1 (urban) for boys, 21.0 (rural) and 21.1 (urban) for girls in the earlier ICMR study and 32.4 cms. for boys and 20.3 cms. for girls from the affluent Indian families. The gain in weight during the same age period was 14.0 Kg. (rural), 17.1 Kg. (urban) for boys and 12.9 Kg. (rural), and 16.0 Kg. (urban) and 26.3 Kg for boys and 19.6 kg. for girls from affluent Indian families5-6.

The average body weight of male and female children from rural areas in this study was significantly lower (p<0.01) than that of urban children at all age points. Also, the adolescent girls from both rural and urban slum

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